Statement from Premier Heather Stefanson and Indigenous Reconciliation and Northern Relations Minister Alan Lagimodiere on Red Dress Day

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News from Broadway
[May 5, 2022] Today, our government encourages all Manitobans to join us in bringing awareness and speaking out against violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples.

In Canada, Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples are disproportionately targeted for violence more so than any other group. Today, we remember those who have been tragically taken too soon and lost their lives to gender-based violence, and we honour the healing journeys of the survivors, their families and communities that live with the grief of losing loved ones. 

National Day of Awareness of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG), also known as Red Dress Day, honours the spirits of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples across the country. The day began as a response to more than 1,000 missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, where red dresses and ribbons are put in windows or hung from trees in memory of the lives lost as a visible reminder of those who are no longer with us. People are encouraged to wear red and hang ribbons or red dresses in support and to raise awareness about MMIWG.

In 2021, our government reaffirmed our commitment to addressing violence against Indigenous women and girls by introducing amendments to the Path to Reconciliation Act that establish the Calls for Justice of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls as a key component of the province’s approach to advancing truth and reconciliation. Addressing violence, in particular the incidences of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, is a priority for the province and it is our government’s intent to continue to take action to prevent and combat gender-based violence of all forms.

The Legislative Building will be lit with the symbolic red dress on May 5th to shine the light on the issue. The red dress is a visual reminder of the tragic issues surrounding missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples across Canada and can be a powerful symbol of hope and acknowledgement.

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https://news.gov.mb.ca/news/?archive=&item=54350